What it takes to lead in health

What it takes to lead in health

Student learning from an academic in clinical lab

Stop, collaborate and listen!

According to Professor Andrew Hayen, Director of Public Health Studies, the ability to listen and collaborate is key to being a great leader.

Taking the lead on a successful public health program requires an openness to sharing knowledge, talents and resources among colleagues – and listening and collaborating with community is part of that, too!

Persistence pays

Albert Einstein famously said “It’s not that I’m so smart, it’s just that I stay with problems longer.”

And one of our Master of Health Services Management students Zohaib Memon couldn’t agree more.

“A great leader will have the perfect combination of resilience and persistence. While the right education sets you in the right direction, it’s experience that truly teaches you.”

Zohaib previously worked as a Registered Nurse and Nursing Unit Manager and is currently the Program Coordinator for Patient Centred Care at the Clinical Excellence Commission*.

*As of May 2018

Student learning from an academic in clinical lab
Student learning from an academic in clinical lab

Teamwork makes the dream work

Ever wondered why group work is at the core of higher education curricula? Because it’s a skill that, if mastered, will propel you to succeed in the real world.

As Professor Fiona Brooks states, “Authentic leadership is about the ability to co-create with colleagues and, most importantly – with patients – to provide the best possible care.” Professor Brooks is currently Assistant Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Research): Development.

We are the change that we seek

He didn’t stay in office for eight years for nothing. Barack Obama believed in change, and so should you.

As Dr Lynn Sinclair, Acting Associate Dean (Teaching and Learning) in the Faculty of Health explains, “Leaders in health must be dynamic. They must be an independent thinker, be able to motivate and inspire and be ready to lead change.”

Student learning from an academic in clinical lab
Student learning from an academic in clinical lab

Think outside the box

The ability to think creatively is incredibly helpful when it comes to solving complex problems. Dr Christine Catling, Director of Midwifery Studies at UTS, says that a “blue sky” attitude is something every leader in health needs.

And creativity can be simple in concept. In leading the creation of woman-centred birth spaces, researchers from the Centre for Midwifery, Child and Family Health have been pivotal in facilitating normal birth and women’s satisfaction with their birth experience – “something that sets up a new family dynamic and contributes towards a successful family unit,” says Christine.

Unlock the future, by learning for life

“Lifetime learners keep themselves at the forefront,” says Shannon Lin, Diabetes Educator, researcher, lecturer and Course Coordinator for the Graduate Certificate in Diabetes Education and Management.

“The healthcare field is rapidly changing; knowledge is the only way to stay ahead. Leaders need to possess strong communication skills, apply the latest evidence and be genuinely supportive of patients’ needs.”

Student learning from an academic in clinical lab
Student learning from an academic in clinical lab

Ready to take the leap?

UTS offers a range of postgraduate courses in nursing, midwifery, public health, palliative care, diabetes education and management and health services management.

Postgraduate Health Courses >

Stop, collaborate and listen!

According to Professor Andrew Hayen, Director of Public Health Studies, the ability to listen and collaborate is key to being a great leader.

Taking the lead on a successful public health program requires an openness to sharing knowledge, talents and resources among colleagues – and listening and collaborating with community is part of that, too!

Persistence pays

Albert Einstein famously said “It’s not that I’m so smart, it’s just that I stay with problems longer.” And one of our Master of Health Services Management students Zohaib Memon couldn’t agree more. “A great leader will have the perfect combination of resilience and persistence. While the right education sets you in the right direction, it’s experience that truly teaches you.” Zohaib previously worked as a Registered Nurse and Nursing Unit Manager and is currently the Program Coordinator for Patient Centred Care at the Clinical Excellence Commission*.

*As of May 2018

Teamwork makes the dream work

Ever wondered why group work is at the core of higher education curricula? Because it’s a skill that, if mastered, will propel you to succeed in the real world. As Professor Fiona Brooks states, “Authentic leadership is about the ability to co-create with colleagues and, most importantly – with patients – to provide the best possible care.” Professor Brooks is currently Assistant Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Research): Development.

We are the change that we seek

He didn’t stay in office for eight years for nothing. Barack Obama believed in change, and so should you. As Dr Lynn Sinclair, Acting Associate Dean (Teaching and Learning) in the Faculty of Health explains, “Leaders in health must be dynamic. They must be an independent thinker, be able to motivate and inspire and be ready to lead change.”

Think outside the box

The ability to think creatively is incredibly helpful when it comes to solving complex problems. Dr Christine Catling, Director of Midwifery Studies at UTS, says that a “blue sky” attitude is something every leader in health needs. And creativity can be simple in concept. In leading the creation of woman-centred birth spaces, researchers from the Centre for Midwifery, Child and Family Health have been pivotal in facilitating normal birth and women’s satisfaction with their birth experience – “something that sets up a new family dynamic and contributes towards a successful family unit,” says Christine.

Unlock the future, by learning for life

“Lifetime learners keep themselves at the forefront,” says Shannon Lin, Diabetes Educator, researcher, lecturer and Course Coordinator for the Graduate Certificate in Diabetes Education and Management. “The healthcare field is rapidly changing; knowledge is the only way to stay ahead. Leaders need to possess strong communication skills, apply the latest evidence and be genuinely supportive of patients’ needs.”

Ready to take the leap?

UTS offers a range of postgraduate courses in nursing, midwifery, public health, palliative care, diabetes education and management and health services management.

Postgrad Health Courses >